Archives for posts with tag: homeschool

77005460Those who have homeschooled their children for a number of years often take bits and pieces from several programs in order to create one that works well for their particular family. Below are some of the most common homeschooling programs.

Relaxed / Eclectic Homeschooling

The “relaxed” or “eclectic” approach to homeschooling combines formal learning and independent study. The children generally use workbooks and programs in order to learn math, reading and spelling, generally in the morning hours. The afternoons are spent pursuing more specialized learning objectives, like hobbies and interactive science projects.

The School-at-Home Approach

For this approach, children perform schoolwork by following a preset structure through boxed curriculum. The children have regular school hours at home, and they often deliver completed materials back to a curriculum provider for grading. This type of approach has a relatively high burnout rate, however.

Unschooling

This type of schooling is also known as natural, child-led and interest-led learning. Children under this approach are free to explore their own interests. Instead of having a separation between “school” and “life,” parents who use this approach see the two as intertwined. Unschooled children don’t take state-mandated tests, and they often meet with other homeschool children in order to learn through private lessons.

Classical

This approach follows the “five tools of learning,” which are reason, record, research, relate and rhetoric. The classical approach has been around since the Middle Ages and has a strict daily routine. The focus of this approach is on reading, history, recitation and critical thinking.

Charlotte Mason

The Charlotte Mason approach follows the belief that children should be respected as people instead of treated as empty vessels waiting to be filled. Children who are homeschooled using this method have a focus on creation and collaboration instead of on reciting facts. There is a strong emphasis on nature and taking field trips to explore art history and geography, among other disciplines.

Waldorf

The Waldorf method focuses on educating the child through body, mind and spirit. The Waldorf method emphasizes nature, arts and crafts, and movement and music. No formal textbooks are used, and the children instead create their own books. Electronics are discouraged, and free play is emphasized.

Montessori

This approach emphasizes the need for children to learn at their own pace. Wood is preferred over plastic, and electronics are discouraged. Homes are set up with different learning areas, such as a math area and a language area. Children are encouraged to manage their own time and learn things thoroughly before moving onto something new.

Multiple Intelligences

In this learning approach, parents become aware of their children’s strengths and adapt the teaching accordingly. For example, children’s learning can be tailored toward visual, auditory or kinetic. Each discipline is taught in a way that best suits the child’s preferred learning method. In this way, nothing is treated as better or worse, but only as how it benefits the individual child.

Please LIKE and FOLLOW for future blogs.

466248995

Deciding to home-school your kids may be a daunting decision. Aside from being the parent and provider, you now have to assume the role of a teacher as well. The thought of where to begin with home-schooling often sends many parents into panic mode and puts them off this idea completely. However, if you would like to home-school your kids, it is achievable. Although, there are challenges as with all things in life, there are also many great homeschooling tips to help you get there.

Homeschooling Tips

Parents that attempt homeschooling often try to duplicate what happens in traditional classrooms as they think this is the best way to teach their child, however, it is not always the case. You should forget about schedule, textbooks and sitting at desks all the time. Despite popular belief, home-schooled kids can be taught valuable social skills, even if they are not sitting in a classroom with 20 other kids. Connect with other families that are doing the same thing. This will open up a world of resources and support that will make the entire process manageable for you and your kids. Technology is meant to be used to help you in your task to educate your children, but it should not be depended upon as the only resource that you use. Ease your children into the process, especially at the beginning of the year. You should gradually introduce subjects each week as school begins, until your kids are settled into the routine and can handle the workload.

You should also remember that this is your school and you decide what activities are done each day. So if you feel like playing math games for half the day and then taking a nature walk for the second half, you should do exactly that as spontaneity is what separates homeschooling from traditional schooling. You should also attend homeschooling conferences as this gives you the opportunity to network and listen to inspirational stories from other parents on the same mission. The world is your classroom and you should make use of all available resources to help your child learn.

There is no doubt that homeschooling has its advantages and a lot of parents truly believe that it is the right path for their children. However, there are always two sides to a coin. Many are against it citing drawbacks that hinder development in different aspects and some of these voices come from individuals who were the products of the system themselves. Here is what they had to say about the drawbacks of homeschooling:

1. Limited Socialization

When your home is also your school, you do not get to meet and interact with a lot of people on a daily basis. You become used to the isolation and find ways to deal with it so you might not mind at all, especially if it is the only thing you’ve ever known. However, there will come a time in the future that you will have to go out in the world such as when you move on to college or apply for work. It will then be a different ballgame and the shift may come as a shock. The limited development of social skills can become a hindrance to success with a lot of tasks needed to be completed by groups.

2. Academic Gaps

Parents can be fantastic teachers at home particularly those who have experience in academic institutions. However, no single individual will be able to master every subject known to man. It’s possible to be widely read and know a good range of subjects but there will inevitably be gaps. These gaps will be passed onto the children who may be able to fill them through their own diligence. In schools, experts teach each of the lessons. They have studied every topic deeply and can answer any question thrown at them.

3. Narrow World View

School was never just about academics. It is also about interaction with teachers and fellow students in order to expand the mind beyond the classroom. There is constant discovery and exchange of ideas. Homeschooling does not provide much of a fertile ground in this regard and children may be confined to a narrow world view.

Follow us at the Bryerson Family Education Blog for more great articles on education, family, and related subjects.